Bisbee’s Day of the Dead

Bisbee loves holidays.

The most favored is probably Halloween, but because of our proximity to Mexico and relationships with our friends just across the border, a strong runner up is Día de los Muertos, Day of the Dead.

An altar at the Bisbee Woman's Club a few days before Día de los Muertos. Photo by Carol Loy

An altar at the Bisbee Woman’s Club a few days before Día de los Muertos.
Photo by Carol Loy

This year the main celebration was at Central School Project, an old primary school turned artists cooperative. And it was fabulous.

A taco stand was set up outside Central School Project.

A taco stand was set up outside Central School Project.

We were welcomed by ten-foot-tall skeletons.

Outside greeter.

Outside greeter.

Another outside greeter.

Another outside greeter.

And the inside greeter at the top of the stairs.

And the inside greeter at the top of the stairs.

There was quite a crowd.

crowd

There was a lot of artwork, mostly paintings and photographs.

art1

More art.

Lovers

Lovers

glass by Rich

And of course, there were altars to the dead.

Several of the altars were created by representatives of the Mexican Consulate in Douglas.

One of the altars by the Mexican Consulate in Douglas.

One of the altars by the Mexican Consulate.

Another from the Mexican Consulate, this one to Pancho Villa.

Another from the Mexican Consulate, this one to Pancho Villa.

This altar was left open for people to place dedications to loved ones. Mine was to all my animalitos.

Woman adding a message to her departed loved ones.

Woman adding a message to her departed loved ones.

Others (unlike me) planned ahead and honored their deceased pets with altars.

To a cat.

To a cat.

To a dog.

To a dog.

birds

There were a few tables selling food and jewelry or art items.

Irene selling jewelry.

Irene selling jewelry.

Kelly selling Día de los Muertos items.

Barbara selling pan de muertos, a special bread made for Día de los Muertos. 

Vicky sells Día de los Muertos items.

Vicky sells Día de los Muertos items.

And members of the local Boys and Girls Club provided entertainment.

Kids performing. NOTE: faces are blurred a bit.

Kids performing.
NOTE: faces are blurred a bit.

And I found out that even the dead can text and take selfies!

dead text

In all, a fabuloso Día de los Muertos celebration!

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14 Comments

  1. I got there really late (at closing), but still was able to see the amazing creativity of the people in this area. Beautiful exhibit!

    Reply

  2. Here’s to the power of sharing culture! It’s such a bridge across differences. I think we need more posts like this. Thx Emilie!

    Reply

  3. I found this post so special… I wish I could be happy for them instead of sad if one of my dear ones died, but I think I still need some more will. Thanks for sharing, this was very interesting 🙂

    Reply

    1. I’m glad you liked it, Lily. It is a beautiful tradition from Mexico and Central America. I have been fortunate to attend in Mexico a few times. In some places, people spend the whole night in the cemetery with their loved ones. They play music, eat meals, and share the meals with the dead. It’s wonderful.

      Reply

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