Yachats to Gold Beach

We left Yachats, noodling slowly south. But before I go on, one noteworthy thing about Yachats that I neglected to mention: public wifi.

The town provides free wifi in many of the public areas including shops, the library, and who knows where else. No passwords (and no protection) but it’s available for anyone to use. More towns need to do this. It’s sometimes hard to find wifi when on the road, so this was a bonus.

Our plan was to drive a whopping seventy-five miles this day to Coos Bay where we would meet up with a friend. And yes, it took all day to get there.

First stop after leaving town was Neptune State Park and Neptune Beach.

Neptune State Park, S. of Yachats - see how blown back the trees are!

Neptune State Park, S. of Yachats – see how blown back the trees are!

Then the Muriel O. Ponsler State Park.

Loved the ripples in the sand at Muriel O. Ponsler Park.

Loved the ripples in the sand at Muriel O. Ponsler Park.

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And of course, a few stops for lighthouses.

Hecta Head Lighthouse.

Hecta Head Lighthouse.

Umpqua Lighthouse. I love lighthouses.

Umpqua Lighthouse. I love lighthouses.

We lunched in Winchester Bay, a nice bay with about a thousand RVs parked around it. It was a bit overwhelming. Its saving grace was the sweet little bay where we found a houseboat-turned-restaurant and split a lunch of fish and chips followed by local ice cream.

Lunch on a floating restaurant in Winchester Bay.

Lunch on a floating restaurant in Winchester Bay.

Yum!

Yum!

And we met another little harbor seal.

Sweet little harbor seal.

Sweet little harbor seal.

Once we got to Coos Bay, we took a somewhat raggedy motel north of town in North Bend – the only place we could find that was affordable.

The bridge into Coos Bay area.

The bridge into Coos Bay area.

We checked in and left right away to meet up with friend Louise, whom we’d met a year ago in Bahia Kino. She’s a full-time RVer traveling with her two dogs. Before her traveling days, she had lived quite awhile in the Coos Bay area, so we knew we’d get a good tour.

After a pleasant but brief time with Louise (she had to get to her book group), we toured the coastal area a bit and the John Topits Park and Lakes then settled in for the night. We’d be up early to meet Louise and do some walking and roaming.

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Old pier, Coos Bay.

Old pier, Coos Bay.

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Morning came and with it came rain. Thankfully I had a rain suit (thanks, Christina!) so I was prepared. I knew I’d be fine in mist or drizzle but wasn’t sure I really wanted to be out in a serious rain. So what did we get? Serious rain. Perfect excuse for a breakfast of blueberry waffles (me) and biscuits and gravy (both Cinda and Louise). And by the time we’d finished, the rain was down to a heavy drizzle and we headed out.

We went west of town to Cape Arago, and wow! A drizzly walk through the trees to some lovely viewpoints, then back through the trees again.

Starting the trail during a drizzle.

Starting the trail during a drizzle.

The muddy trail at Cape Arago.

The muddy trail at Cape Arago.

Rough trail at times!

Rough trail at times!

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The trees were killed by cormorant guano.

The trees were killed by cormorant guano.

We made another stop on the way out of the area and saw hundreds of harbor seals and sea lions.

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Cinda said they were like writhing maggots.

Cinda said they were like writhing maggots.

Then Cinda and I figured we’d better be on our way if we wanted to meet our goal of about seventy-five miles a day, so we said goodbye to Louise and headed south.

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Bandon was our next stop for walking around. There we encountered a small community radio station that is totally operated via the internet.

South of town we stopped for more beautiful beach views including a view of Face Rock which has a long story, a Native American legend. The story is too long for here but is worth looking up.

Just south of Bandon, Oregon.

Just south of Bandon, Oregon.

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Face Rock, Bandon, Oregon.

Face Rock, Bandon, Oregon.

After walking the kinks out, we continued to Gold Beach.

North of Gold Beach

North of Gold Beach

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Gold Beach.

Gold Beach.

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20 Comments

  1. Beautiful, beautiful I appreciate the sharing of your and Cinda’s journey! Someday, I want to do more than travel vicariously, but this has been great!!

    Reply

  2. It was fun to see what you did. I’ve been to most of those spots. Spots I found relaxing and meditative. Welcome home.

    Reply

  3. Beaufiful photos Em ~! I remember staying in Yachats one time… at a fun hotel on the beach.. where each room was named by its decor & such. I hopped out on a hike across the road.. into the lush forest .. and in about 15 minutes.. and thought I saw a black hear. It ran off.. and I walked further around the corner of the trail.. to see if it really was.. and hooray.. it was ~! It stood & looked at me… & then.. I realized.. holy shit.. I better high tail it out of here. That’s a bear & I don’t have any way of protecting myself. Dang! Got to the hotel. and the gals there said they hadn’t seen a bear around there for 20 years! My lucky day 🙂

    Reply

  4. This made me smile- when I was a girl, a light house was my ‘dream house”.
    P.S. my parents worried… alot!

    Reply

    1. Living in a lighthouse sounds fabulous! On the West Coast, you can now rent the lighthouse keeper’s quarters for the night for a small chunk of change. Would love to do that one day.

      Reply

  5. Lovely photos Emilie! I am loving this coastline with the rugged rocks and the waves crashing in. I also have a soft spot for lighthouses:)

    Reply

  6. Wow, wow, Emilie! So many stunning adventures and photos–thank you for sharing. Especially love my lighthouses, and the seals and sea lions, and of course, the houseboat-restaurant. Love it!

    Reply

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